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Infrastructure, Construction and Transport

Our lawyers in Mauritius are at the forefront of advising the infrastructure, construction and transport sector, working with clients who invest in, own, operate, manage or provide services to infrastructure assets. 

From the roads which transport our goods, to the telecommunications which keep us connected, world class infrastructure provides the foundations to create jobs, grow business and connect people with essential services. 

Our experience spans renewable energy, waste, education, healthcare as well as and leisure, roads, bridges, aviation, shipping and ports, among others. 

The firm's team of litigation lawyers also acts for clients before the Independent Review Panel and the various courts of Mauritius.

Experience has included advising:

  • Aurecon (Singapore) Pte Ltd. on the Mauritius Light Railway Transport project and in that regard, reviewing all RFP documents for the project, advising on all legal issues such as procurement, environmental, tax occupational, land acquisition and contractual legal issues. In addition, as local counsel, participating in discussions with bidders.
  • The Chantier Naval de l’Océan Indien shipyard with regard to ship repair and ship building contracts.
  • An Irish aircraft lessor on the sale and finance leaseback of seven (7) Bombardier Dash 8 Series aircraft for sublease to a Kenyan aircraft operator involved in humanitarian air transportation in Africa.

Civil lawsuits in Burundi during COVID-19

The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented. COVID-19 has spread worldwide, and the Republic of Burundi has adopted preventive measures that have affected institutions’ activities in different ways.

The time is now for continental unity in African dispute settlement

Africa is on the cusp of what could be a break in a decades-long cycle of poverty and economic shortcomings. Whether this cycle will be broken depends on the ability of African nations to put in place policies that attract and protect foreign and intra-African investment. These policies must demonstrate to investors that the rule of law will be upheld; that equitable, local dispute settlement is possible; and that potential gains will be greater than the risks involved. The enactment of the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) was a huge step in the right direction. This agreement lays a solid foundation for increased intra-African trade in both goods and services and looks to build on the collective strengths of African nations and African citizens.